Tuesday, July 05, 2005

Idiotic

Dawn Of The Dead REMAKE-28 million budget-makes 60 million domestic

The Land Of The Dead-15 million budget-16 million made back so far

My stomach churns when a maverick director who filmed the original Dawn.. can't even compete with a remake of his own work. The Land of the Dead should have made at least double what it's taken in so far. And it should have trounced the Dawn remake.

I loathe people.

10 Comments:

The Moviequill said...

wow, I am surprised... I thought Horror was THE genre right now. How come nobody mentions Return Of The Living Dead? I know it was campy but it's not considered part of the zombie legacy?

John Donald Carlucci said...

Here is where I get flamed...

I think that Romero had his day. He did some good zombie stuff (first two films) and some okay work otherwise. I don't fall at his feet because his stuff doesn't thrill me. His directing style is slow and plodding. It was fine for Dawn Of The Dead, but not fine now.

I'm also not interested because the commercials lead me to believe that the zombies are not fast moving and thinking. None of this was setup in the first three and don't throw Bud at me. Bud was the result of extensive surgical alteration and behavioral modification. It just looks like the guy that started it all chucked parts of his concept to lift material from newer zombie films. Slow moving zombies can still be frightening and requires a good director to make it work.

Adding elements such as thinking depowers the zombies the same adding a borg queen sucked the life out of the threat of the borg. The borg were frightening because there numbers were unknown and they just kept coming. Much like Mike Meyers, the threat was unstoppable.

JDC

John Donald Carlucci said...

Actually, I enjoyed RotLD very much (not just for the lovely nude punk girl). Were those the first fast zombies?

JDC

JD said...

John-I understand Romero is not everyone's cup of tea. My concern lies with the fact that the man will likely not get another chance to produce another major motion picture after this, TLOTD. And yes, the zombies are slow and plodding, and I like it that way. That being said, the remake struck an obvious cord, and I believe it's the teenagers. We're now at a point where story doesn't matter. Running zombies look cooler, so the studios make cool looking movies, but not a film that has any semblence of story. And that to me, is the biggest heartbreaker here-Romero, who many claim to be past his prime, still gives us a story, whereas the flash in the pain, quick cash generating, remake completely skips any story that was initially there.

By the by, the original script for Day Of The Dead was huge and way ahead of its time. The role of zombies learning and arming themselves in TLOTD came strictly from Romero's own draft of Day. He didn't rip any of the elements of TLOTD from anyone except himself. He was issued an ultimatum by the studio-Either film Day of the Dead for 3 million with as much violence as he wanted, or don't make it at all.

JD said...

Also, the fact that people flock to see a zombie movie like the DotD remake, yet stay away in droves from LotD makes me wonder ....what zombie fan doesn't go to see a major zombie movie? Running makes that much of a difference?

John Donald Carlucci said...

I think the ad campaign was just plain crap for Land. Let's ignore the irony of using music from Resident Evil, but the damn ads were a watered down mismash. The resident evil ads were much stronger in content and dramatic.

I have no problem with fast or slow zombies and I did think there was as much story in the new as the old. I think the mistake for the new film was too many characters. They needed a smaller group to allow more character development. That little girl in the DotD remake creeped the fuck out of me. The husband's quick change was ferocious. I want to be scared a bit and Romero doesn't deliver that to me. Now, I feel the same way about Carpenter (and I love Carpenter), but think he is selling short his own talents with crap like Ghosts of Mars. I refuse to believe that these directors don't have the resources to pull together smaller horror films themselves, or can't bring D2DVD projects to different production companies to rebuild there cred. Look at what they pulled together during the beginning of their careers where the resources to independent filmmakers was almost non-existent.

I don't think a director loses what made them good. I think a director loses what makes him good when he thinks he has lost it and apes others.

Day of the Dead was missing hope. The lead actress sucked the life out of every scene she was in. I know her character was beaten and battered by what was happening, but I needed more from her to counter the end of the world that was happening. The movie failed for me because I didn't give a damn about a single character. Not a single one. I like every lead in DotD-org, and I cared about the people of Night, but Day left me rooting for Bud. I wanted to care, but couldnt work any sympathy up for them.

Shawn of the Dead made me care more for the characters than Day. It was a comedy, yet I was horrified at the death of Shaun's mother and step father. I felt his agony when his mom turned and wondered how I would handle the same situation. There was more emotion in that scene than the whole Day (and there were slow zombies).

Sorry if I am beating a dead horse. I've had this conversation with Romerians who worship the stool he makes because the master did it. A filmmaker proves himself everytime he makes a film (as do writers). Sadly, Romero has stumbled a lot.

JDC

John Donald Carlucci said...

"The role of zombies learning and arming themselves in TLOTD came strictly from Romero's own draft of Day."

I stand corrected, but still consider it a serious mistake. We have been shown that these creature continue to decompose during the film and I see no way there would be time for this learning/arming to take place. Not unless we are dealing with zombies from RotLD. I still think the hordes of shambling dead were more scary than anything else.

JDC

JD said...

Well, if we're going to get into what's scary and what's not, I'll agree that I'm not frightened by Romero's movies. Maybe Night, just because it looks scary. But I just think his zombie movies are better films than the newer zombie snore fests. (I liked Shaun too, but that's a different genre imo) My disillusion is more with the countless remakes than Romero. I had an even bigger problem with the Texas Chainsaw remake. It seems to me this is backwards thinking. A studio could just as easily re-release the original and make profit hand over fist since they wouldn't be funding a new movie. Why not do that? That way the studio keeps its dignity, and they also reap a profit. It's really a win/win situation. Plus, the younger generation can view a classic, and not a watered down action film.

John Donald Carlucci said...

"A studio could just as easily re-release the original and make profit hand over fist since they wouldn't be funding a new movie. Why not do that? That way the studio keeps its dignity, and they also reap a profit. It's really a win/win situation. Plus, the younger generation can view a classic, and not a watered down action film."

There are several problems with this thought. The first is that this is your opinion that the studio would make money off of a new release of the original DotD. I doubt that and would need to see some hard figure on that. The younger generation isn't interested in such ancient films. Hell, most filmmakers could give a damn about anything older than the 80s (at best). They consider Scream (shudder) a classic. I can mention Howard Hawks and get a blank fucking stare. Cary Grant is some hot olden day playboy they heard of and Alfred Hitchcock was some kind of director.

Look at the remake of the Fog. Tom Welling boasted that new new cast was all younger than the oldest original cast member. What an ass. It will be a great film since all of the parts a have been populated by twenty-somethings and very realistic at that. The studio wants their newest stars up on the screen and couldn't care less for the original material.

JD said...

Well we can all be thankful they're digging their own graves.